Suffredin- For a Better Cook County  
 

Accountability
Forest Preserves
Public Safety
Cook County Budget
Forest Pres. Budget
Property Tax Appeal
Health & Hospitals
Land Bank Authority
Policy Resolutions
Unsung Heroine

 

   
 
   
   
 
   
     
  Office phone numbers:  
   
 
 

The Cook County Code of Ordinances are the current laws of Cook County.

   
 

Search current and proposed Cook County Legislation in Larry's exclusive legislative library.

   
  Cook County has the largest unified trial court system in the world, disposing over 6 million cases in 1990 alone.
   
     
     
     



Chicago hearing debates rise in attacks by girls

Friday, October 21, 2005
Chicago Tribune
by Charles Sheehan

The home videos that have surfaced are troubling, showing groups of teen girls swinging fists and kicking their victims.

Some of the statistics are sensational, too, with the number of girls arrested for aggravated assault on a dramatic rise, according to FBI statistics.

The issue of girl-on-girl violence was the only topic on the agenda Thursday during the annual hearing of the Cook County Commission on Women's Issues, which will submit a report on the subject to the Board of Commissioners next year.

The issue has become a topic of discussion nationally in part because of a number of home videos that show girls attacking others. One of the most notorious videos, which circulated nationally in 2003, showed girls at a Glenbrook North High School "powder puff" football game in a forest preserve beating and throwing things at younger classmates. Sixteen students were found guilty of criminal battery or alcohol-related charges in that incident.

Nearly everyone who testified at the public hearing said girl-on-girl violence is a problem, but also questioned whether statistics tell the whole story.

"My preliminary research has shown this issue to be very complex and it's not at all clear if this type of violence is on the way up or if it's just that more girls are being arrested more often," said Eva Mika, a researcher with the county commission who will put the report together.

Chicago Public Schools officials say there is little evidence of an acute rise in attacks.

The school district breaks down student offenses in its Uniform Discipline Code by numbers ranging from one to six--one being a very minor offense and five and six being crimes like aggravated battery or arson.

In the 2001-2002 school year, of the 15,214 violations of four or greater, 27 percent were committed by girls.

That number remained flat until the 2004-2005 school year, when such violations increased to 18,675, with 28 percent being committed by females, according to Chicago Public Schools.

The district, however, has been much more aggressive in requiring schools to report violations, which could account for some of the increases, said spokesman Mike Vaughn.

"I'm not suggesting that there was not an increase, but at first glance, there is no real trend toward more girls being involved in more serious crime," he said.

The percentage of female detainees in the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center on Sept. 1, 1995, was 6 percent. The percentage of girls at the center this year, as of Sept. 1, was more than 9 percent, according to Ron Olbaker, who runs statistics for the facility.

Nationwide between 1967 and 1996, the number of female juveniles arrested for violent crimes jumped 345 percent, compared with 124 percent for males during the same period, according to FBI figures.

A report completed last year by the state of Illinois found similar figures but also that police may be filing charges against girls today when they may not have in the past.

"Girls are now being arrested for behavior that 10 or 20 years ago, because of paternalism, they would not have been arrested," Mika said.

There is also a belief that easy access to video cameras has skewed the public perception, making it seem as though such attacks occur constantly.

Last month in Orland Park, teenagers videotaped an assault by three girls on another girl. All three are scheduled to appear in court on Monday.

Two high school students who testified Thursday at the hearing said it was common practice for girls to slick their faces with petroleum jelly at Chicago schools to avoid gashes from fingernails.

Hair is often clipped back so it would not be pulled out, said Maya Yancey-Gilmore, 17, one of two students who gave a presentation.

Her mother pulled her from Lincoln Park High School after her first year because of fights there. Maya is now a junior at St. Scholastica, a Catholic school.

"I didn't want to live with the fear and I was afraid every day," said her mother, Greer Gilmore.

 



Recent Headlines

Cook County commissioners move to reclaim health powers
Wednesday, March 25, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

Cook County’s sweetened beverage tax worked: UIC study
Tuesday, February 25, 2020
WGN News

‘Sea change’ in county health system could put Preckwinkle, commissioners closer to the helm
Tuesday, February 25, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Fed Up With Postal Service Problems, North Side Officials Vow To Fix Constant Delivery Woes In Rogers Park
Tuesday, February 25, 2020
Block Club Chicago

Cook County's short-lived 'soda' tax worked, says new study
Tuesday, February 25, 2020
University Of Illinois at Chicago

Annals of Internal Medicine: Sweetened Beverage Study
Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Elevating Evanston Youth
Monday, February 24, 2020
Northwestern

Cook County Health finance chief departs
Monday, February 24, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

$14 million settlement proposed in lawsuit over Cook County inmates masturbating in front of female public defenders
Sunday, February 23, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

The correct response to violent crime? Believe it or not, we're seeing it in Cook County.
Friday, February 21, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

For The First Time In More Than A Decade, The Waitlist For Suburban Public Housing Is Opening
Friday, February 21, 2020
WBEZ News

Flashback: Cook County Hospital was home to big egos, surgical drama and stalwarts who found purpose in treating the poor
Friday, February 21, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Can courts do more to force FOID card violators to give up their guns?
Monday, February 17, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Keep the Cook County Health board independent
Sunday, February 16, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

Park Ridge looks to move 911 dispatching services to Cook County call center
Thursday, February 13, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Editorial: A report’s flaws suggest: Cook County bail reforms may have endangered the public
Thursday, February 13, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Offering rehab instead of jail time, ‘Drug Court’ gives some a second chance
Thursday, February 13, 2020
WGN News

Preckwinkle aide barred from her offices after sexual harassment incident
Tuesday, February 11, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

New outreach group combating Cook County’s opioid crisis by offering treatment, hope
Tuesday, February 11, 2020
WGN News

Evanston Officials Eye County Grant for Construction of New Animal Shelter
Monday, February 10, 2020
Evanston RoundTable

all news items

Paid for by Larry Suffredin and not at taxpayer expense. A Haymarket Production.
^ TOP