Suffredin- Changing County Government  
 

Accountability
Forest Preserves
Public Safety
Cook County Budget
Forest Pres. Budget
Property Tax Appeal
Health & Hospitals
Land Bank Authority
Policy Resolutions
Unsung Heroine

 

   
 
   
   
 
   
     
  Office phone numbers:  
   
 
 

The Cook County Code of Ordinances are the current laws of Cook County.

   
 

Search current and proposed Cook County Legislation in Larry's exclusive legislative library.

   
  Cook County is the second most populous county in the nation. It is the 19th largest government in the U.S.
   
     
     
     



Wilmette to reconsider adopting Cook County minimum wage, sick time laws next month

Wednesday, May 16, 2018
Chicago Tribune
by Kathy Routliffe


The Wilmette Village Board will consider next month whether to stick with a 2017 decision to opt out of Cook County’s minimum wage and paid sick time ordinances, or to opt back in to them.

Village President Bob Bielinski told a room full of supporters and opponents Tuesday that two ordinances repealing the board’s 2017 opt-out decision would be introduced when the board meets June 12. Board members could make the final decision at their June 26 meeting.

The board received a final report from a working group formed last year by Bielinski to research the potential impact of the ordinances on Wilmette employers, employees and residents. But members also heard from 37 people speaking for or against repealing the its June 27, 2017 decision to opt out of the county regulations that would hike the minimum wage in stages to $13 by 2020, and would require employers to provide paid sick leave to employees working at least 80 hours in a 120-day period.

After the 2017 vote, the board agreed to revisit the decision, and in December, Bielinski appointed a working group to gather research.

Forrmer village president John Jacoby, who chaired the working group through seven meetings and months of data gathering, presented highlights from its final 436-page report.

Among the findings:

• State employment data shows that 20 percent of workers in Wilmette are considered low-wage earners, making $1,250 or less a month

• A survey of Wilmette businesses found that 54 percent oppose the minimum wage ordinance, and 57 percent opposed the paid sick time ordinance

• A survey of residents showed 66 percent supported the minimum wage ordinance and 67 supported the paid sick time ordinance

• While academic research is inconclusive, Jacoby said, “in general, the literature finds that minimum wage has a small impact or no impact on employment.”

Jacoby said his seven-person body worked hard to avoid bias in the questions it asked and in the final report.

“I think folks who want to opt in can find data in this report to support their position, and folks who oppose it can also find data to support their position,” Jacoby said.

Of the 37 people who spoke at the meeting, 19 supported opting back in to the county’s guidelines, while 18 argued against doing so.

Opponents said the wage and sick time requirements would hurt both village businesses and minimum wage workers, and represented undue government encroachment on business owner’s ability to operate.

Supporters said the county rules wouldn’t hurt local businesses, and would improve the lives of Wilmette’s low wage workers.

Information on the working group’s report is available at www.wilmette.com, in the agenda packet for the committee of the whole meeting.

kroutliffe@pioneerlocal.com

Twitter @pioneer_kathy



Recent Headlines

Forest Preserves of Cook County Events and Programs – February 2020
Tuesday, January 28, 2020
Special to suffredin.org

Vacant For Decades, Cook County Hospital’s Transformation Into Hotel, Medical Offices Nearly Complete
Tuesday, January 28, 2020
Block Club Chicago

New voting machines will be installed in Chicago and Cook County polling places in time for early voting and the March 17 primary election, officials say
Monday, January 27, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Cook County ethics board approves reforms as member resigns in protest of President Toni Preckwinkle’s move to replace chair
Friday, January 24, 2020
Chicago Tribune

For property tax relief, reduce the cost of local government
Friday, January 24, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

County's Board of Ethics takes aim at side gigs
Friday, January 24, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

Flashback: Secret experiments in a Cook County preserve aided atomic bomb efforts — and left nuclear waste behind
Friday, January 24, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Cook County Health Needs A New CEO. Could Politics Get In The Way?
Wednesday, January 22, 2020
WBEZ News

Search for new Cook County Health CEO expected to take about 6 months
Wednesday, January 22, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Deadline for Senior Citizen Property Tax Deferral
Tuesday, January 21, 2020
Special to suffredin.org

Kaegi: 'The embrace of a failed status quo makes no sense'
Tuesday, January 21, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

City Club of Chicago: Cook County Assessor Fritz Kaegi
Tuesday, January 21, 2020
WGN Radio

Cook County Assessor Staying Below The Radar
Tuesday, January 21, 2020
WBBM Radio

Census hiring event Wednesday in Schaumburg
Monday, January 20, 2020
Daily Herald

Proposed health oversight shift not a ‘power grab,’ Cook County officials say
Thursday, January 16, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

Cook County Cashes In On Legal Weed
Thursday, January 16, 2020
WBEZ News

Cook County OKs 3% marijuana tax
Thursday, January 16, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

Preckwinkle looks to claw back some oversight of Cook County Health
Thursday, January 16, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

Pace Announces Public Hearings on Proposed North Shore Service Changes
Thursday, January 16, 2020
Special to suffredin.org

Pot taxes in Chicago could be as high as 41% by July as county moves forward with 3% levy
Wednesday, January 15, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

all news items

Paid for by Larry Suffredin and not at taxpayer expense. A Haymarket Production.
^ TOP