Suffredin- An Advocate for All of Us  
 

Accountability
Forest Preserves
Public Safety
Cook County Budget
Forest Pres. Budget
Property Tax Appeal
Health & Hospitals
Land Bank Authority
Policy Resolutions
Unsung Heroine

 

   
 
   
   
 
   
     
  Office phone numbers:  
   
 
 

The Cook County Code of Ordinances are the current laws of Cook County.

   
 

Search current and proposed Cook County Legislation in Larry's exclusive legislative library.

   
  Cook County is the second most populous county in the nation. It is the 19th largest government in the U.S.
   
     
     
     



County Board passes resolution to ‘redirect funds from policing and incarceration to public services’
Commissioner Brandon Johnson, D-Chicago, who sponsored the measure, said, “We’re spending almost $5 million a day policing alone, and that hasn’t solved any of our systemic problems.”

Thursday, July 30, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times
by Rachel Hinton

The Cook County Board of Commissioners voted Thursday to redirect money from arresting people and locking them up to housing, health care and job creation, in the midst of a tough budget season and a national conversation on race and policing.

The resolution, called Justice for Black Lives, says the county “should engage in efforts to redirect funds from policing and incarceration to public services not administered by law enforcement that promote community health and safety equitably across the County, but especially in Black and Brown communities most impacted by violence and incarceration.”

Commissioner Brandon Johnson, D-Chicago, who sponsored the measure and introduced it at last month’s virtual meeting, said that he lives “in a community that reflects many of our hopes and dreams,” talking about his West Side district, which includes the Austin neighborhood.

“We’re spending almost $5 million a day policing alone, and that hasn’t solved any of our systemic problems,” Johnson said. “We have work to do, we are saying that there are very difficult decisions that we will have to make in the coming months.”

The resolution notes that despite a 50% decrease in the number of people incarcerated in the Cook County jail between 2013 and 2020, the budget for the county’s Corrections Department grew by 26% during that time. “Almost all” of the people detained at the jail are there awaiting trial because they cannot afford to pay a money bond, the text of the resolution says.

Commissioner Frank Aguilar voted present on the item, saying he feels “defunding of the police department” could be “very dangerous for our communities.”

Sean Morrison, R-Palos Park, was the sole no vote, saying before the roll call that he’d be voting against the measure because he felt it focused just on defunding the police and not “individual” problems, such as housing and health care inequities, that the resolution seeks to address.

“This resolution offends our very officers in Chicago, in Cook County, in our suburbs and in our state, it’s offensive to them, it’s offensive for their families,” Morrison said. “So if we’re going to be serious, let’s put together serious resolutions that address, and attack individual items that do need to be fixed.”

It’s not yet clear what the resolution could mean for Sheriff Tom Dart’s office, though he as well as others in the county, are being asked to cut their budgets because of the pandemic’s effect on the county’s usual revenue sources.

Last month, Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle told the Chicago Sun-Times “we have to dramatically reduce the amount we spend on law enforcement.” She tempered that by adding: “I think it doesn’t make sense to think that you can have no police. … The police can’t be an agent for oppression and enforcers of racial inequality. The police have to be public servants.”

At a news conference following the board meeting Thursday, Preckwinkle said the resolution is set against a “backdrop of national and local protests.”“While these conversations are long overdue, they could not have happened during a more pressing moment for our nation,” Preckwinkle said. “But I’ve said throughout my career, I believe there’s clearly a need for police reform and for reducing and redirecting our investment in law enforcement ... [the] resolution provides us a framework as we consider our priorities and how we can better serve our communities and honor Black lives.”



Recent Headlines

Thousands of suburban students going back to school after starting fully remote
Monday, September 28, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Illinois’ coronavirus-related death toll surpasses 8,600
Sunday, September 27, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Column: Cook County assessment report verifies what many already knew: Our property tax system is unfair
Sunday, September 27, 2020
Daily Southtown

Letter from the Cook County Health Interim CEO
Friday, September 25, 2020
Special to suffredin.org

They’re not otters, but endangered mussels in Illinois play a crucial role as environmental sentinels. ‘They all have a story to tell.’
Friday, September 25, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Cook County spends $292,000 to assess feasibility of repairing Port of Chicago
Friday, September 25, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Will your mailed-in ballot be counted? We did a test-mailing to see.
Friday, September 25, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

After ethics spat, Cook County code on its way to a revamp
Thursday, September 24, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

County Board to renew Preckwinkle emergency powers, lay ground rules to pick new IG
Thursday, September 24, 2020
Daily Line

Officials Urge Residents to Get Flu Shot as State Reports 2,257 New Cases of COVID-19
Thursday, September 24, 2020
WTTW News

3 ethics board exits later, Cook County commissioners unveil first draft of ethics code reforms
Thursday, September 24, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Cook County plans to give out grants of up to $10,000 to small businesses hit hard by pandemic
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Groups call for big changes in an office stuck in the carbon paper era
Tuesday, September 22, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

Next Cook County Circuit Court Clerk Must Improve Public Access, Accountability, Legal Groups Say
Tuesday, September 22, 2020
WTTW News

Illinois secretary of state’s office letter to voters causes confusion for some mail-in ballot applicants
Monday, September 21, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Confusion delivered in mail-in voting letters from Illinois Secretary of State Jesse White
Monday, September 21, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

HACC Wait Listing Opening
Monday, September 21, 2020
Special to suffredin.org

A national group studied commercial property tax assessments in Cook County under the last assessor, Joe Berrios. The results were not pretty.
Monday, September 21, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Cook County Jail set for in-person voting despite COVID-19 setbacks: ‘It’s also about social justice, it’s about fairness, it’s about hope’
Monday, September 21, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Workdays for Perkins Woods
Monday, September 21, 2020
Special to suffredin.org

all news items

Paid for by Larry Suffredin and not at taxpayer expense. A Haymarket Production.
^ TOP