Suffredin- For a Better Cook County  
 

Accountability
Forest Preserves
Public Safety
Cook County Budget
Forest Pres. Budget
Property Tax Appeal
Health & Hospitals
Land Bank Authority
Policy Resolutions
Unsung Heroine

 

   
 
   
   
 
   
     
  Office phone numbers:  
   
 
 

The Cook County Code of Ordinances are the current laws of Cook County.

   
 

Search current and proposed Cook County Legislation in Larry's exclusive legislative library.

   
  The Cook County Forest Preserve District maintains over 70 miles of bicycle trails.
   
     
     
     



Coronavirus in Illinois updates: 3 states removed from Chicago’s travel quarantine list; 1,549 new confirmed cases, 20 deaths reported

Tuesday, August 11, 2020
Chicago Tribune

The Chicago Department of Public Health on Tuesday removed Iowa, Kansas and Utah from the city’s travel quarantine list. Currently visitors or residents returning from 20 states and territories are ordered to self-quarantine for 14 days when they arrive in the city to help slow the spread of COVID-19.

Illinois public health officials on Tuesday announced 1,549 new confirmed case of COVID-19 and 20 additional deaths.

The state has now reported 196,948 cases overall and 7,657 confirmed deaths.

Meanwhile, Congress and the White House are still locked in a stalemate over a coronavirus relief package. There were no new talks on Monday as Democrats dismissed President Donald Trump’s executive orders as insufficient.

But some relief is in sight for Illinois renters who have been unable to pay their rent due to coronavirus-related financial difficulty. They can apply for one-time grants of $5,000 through a new state program that began Monday — and relief for homeowners is next.

Here’s what’s happening Tuesday with COVID-19 in the Chicago area and Illinois:

12 p.m.: Summer jobs for teens, college students vanishing during the pandemic

The iconic summer job for high school and college students has been on the wane for nearly 20 years. But the pandemic is squeezing even more young people out of the workforce.

Some are borrowing more money. Others have turned to pick-up jobs like Instacart, only to compete with older people who are similarly sidelined.

“They’re at the very bottom of the labor queue. And when things get tough, they get pushed out very quickly,” said Paul Harrington, a Drexel University education professor and director of the Center for Labor Markets and Policy. “And that’s why we expect a historically low unemployment summer jobs rate.”

The unemployment rate for people ages 16 to 24 was 18.5% in July compared with 9.1% the same month last year, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers released Friday.

A fuller picture will emerge on Aug. 18 when the bureau releases figures on 2020 summer youth employment. But it’s already clear that many jobs have vanished. Read more here. —The Associated Press

10:50 a.m.: Iowa, Kansas, Utah removed from Chicago’s travel quarantine list

The Chicago Department of Public Health on Tuesday removed Iowa, Kansas and Utah from the city’s travel quarantine list. Currently visitors or residents returning from 20 states and territories are ordered to self-quarantine for 14 days when they arrive in the city to help slow the spread of COVID-19.

The states and territories currently affected by the order are Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin.

Officials said Wisconsin and Nebraska could be removed from the order next week if their case numbers remain low. —Chicago Tribune staff

10 a.m.: The ‘summer slide’ was tough before COVID-19, but getting kids in back-to-school mode is extra tough this year. Here are some tips to get you started.

Even before the pandemic prompted school closures in the spring, education researchers were concerned about the so-called “summer slide,” a term used to describe skills and knowledge lost in the break between school years.

A study published last month in the American Educational Research Journal found 52% of U.S. students experience learning losses in the five summers between the first and sixth grades. The typical student loses 17% to 28% of school-year gains in English language arts and 25% to 34% of school-year gains in math during the following summer, according to the study, which analyzed more than 200 million test scores recorded between 2008 and 2016.

It’s too early to tell what this year’s summer slide numbers will look like, especially as Chicago-area schools, libraries, museums and other places kids may have gone to continue learning have been closed for at least part of the summer. Education specialists suggest a number of ways to prepare children for the new school year, including frequently reading with them, incorporating math into their everyday activities and practicing skills they should already know. Read more here. —Tracy Swartz

8:50 a.m.: After weighing the COVID-19 risks, these college students are heading to campus. ‘I hope it doesn’t get worse.’

Elmwood Park resident Natalie Maite said she’s “not nervous” about living on campus at St. Norbert College in De Pere, Wisc., despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

Maite, who graduated from Trinity High School, said she will live in the campus dorms, which require her to wear a mask when walking through the hallways.

She’s one of several local college students who weighed the risks of COVID-19, which lurk in cramped college dorm rooms, communal bathrooms, enormous lecture halls and big dining hall buffets, and decided that learning on campus was worth the gamble. Read more here. —Steve Schering, Pioneer Press

8:40 a.m.: Wisconsin holding another primary election today, with about 900,000 voters requesting absentee ballots

Wisconsin's second statewide election since the coronavirus began came with far more time to prepare than the first, with election officials hoping for a correspondingly smoother result in Tuesday's primary.

The state's presidential primary in April was a messy affair, with municipalities forced to shut down polling sites after workers refused to show up out of fear of contracting the virus. The postal system was overwhelmed with absentee ballots.

Absentee voting has again been intense, with some 900,000 such ballots requested by people looking to avoid in-person voting. That compares with around 123,000 in the primary two years ago.

Gov. Tony Evers has activated the National Guard to help staff polling sites. Officials in Milwaukee expected to be able to run about 170 polling sites after offering just five in April. They offered poll workers an additional $100 and launched a recruiting effort, said Julietta Henry, director of the Milwaukee County Election Commission. Read more here. —The Associated Press

8 a.m.: Goose Island’s 2020 Bourbon County lineup announced — but amid coronavirus, crowds for release may be less than stout

The Bourbon County show must go on.

Exactly how it will go on during the coronavirus pandemic is unclear. But as it has for the past 10 years, Goose Island Beer Co. will release its flock of barrel-aged Bourbon County beers the day after Thanksgiving across Chicago and beyond.

The release can attract long lines and thick crowds, both at stores and at Goose Island’s Clybourn Avenue taproom, where the beers are typically tapped throughout the day and the brewery hosts pricey guided tastings.

But if the COVID-19 pandemic persists into November — which seems likelier than not — those crowds may become a public health hazard. With more than three months until the Nov. 27 release, Goose Island president Todd Ahsmann said it was too soon to predict what tweaks may be made to the release. Read more here. —Josh Noel

Breaking coronavirus news

Stay up to date with the latest information on coronavirus with our breaking news alerts.

Here are four things that happened related to COVID-19 on Monday.



Recent Headlines

Thousands of suburban students going back to school after starting fully remote
Monday, September 28, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

State groups bemoan stop-and-go decisions affecting the census deadline
Monday, September 28, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Coronavirus live blog, Sept. 28, 2020: Will CPS kids go back to schools this fall? Lightfoot says ‘we’re not there yet’
Monday, September 28, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Illinois’ coronavirus-related death toll surpasses 8,600
Sunday, September 27, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Column: Cook County assessment report verifies what many already knew: Our property tax system is unfair
Sunday, September 27, 2020
Daily Southtown

Letter from the Cook County Health Interim CEO
Friday, September 25, 2020
Special to suffredin.org

They’re not otters, but endangered mussels in Illinois play a crucial role as environmental sentinels. ‘They all have a story to tell.’
Friday, September 25, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Cook County spends $292,000 to assess feasibility of repairing Port of Chicago
Friday, September 25, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Will your mailed-in ballot be counted? We did a test-mailing to see.
Friday, September 25, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

After ethics spat, Cook County code on its way to a revamp
Thursday, September 24, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

County Board to renew Preckwinkle emergency powers, lay ground rules to pick new IG
Thursday, September 24, 2020
Daily Line

Officials Urge Residents to Get Flu Shot as State Reports 2,257 New Cases of COVID-19
Thursday, September 24, 2020
WTTW News

3 ethics board exits later, Cook County commissioners unveil first draft of ethics code reforms
Thursday, September 24, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Cook County plans to give out grants of up to $10,000 to small businesses hit hard by pandemic
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Groups call for big changes in an office stuck in the carbon paper era
Tuesday, September 22, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

Next Cook County Circuit Court Clerk Must Improve Public Access, Accountability, Legal Groups Say
Tuesday, September 22, 2020
WTTW News

Illinois secretary of state’s office letter to voters causes confusion for some mail-in ballot applicants
Monday, September 21, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Confusion delivered in mail-in voting letters from Illinois Secretary of State Jesse White
Monday, September 21, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

HACC Wait Listing Opening
Monday, September 21, 2020
Special to suffredin.org

A national group studied commercial property tax assessments in Cook County under the last assessor, Joe Berrios. The results were not pretty.
Monday, September 21, 2020
Chicago Tribune

all news items

Paid for by Larry Suffredin and not at taxpayer expense. A Haymarket Production.
^ TOP