Suffredin- An Advocate for All of Us  
 

Accountability
Forest Preserves
Public Safety
Cook County Budget
Forest Pres. Budget
Property Tax Appeal
Health & Hospitals
Land Bank Authority
Policy Resolutions
Unsung Heroine

 

   
 
   
   
 
   
     
  Office phone numbers:  
   
 
 

The Cook County Code of Ordinances are the current laws of Cook County.

   
 

Search current and proposed Cook County Legislation in Larry's exclusive legislative library.

   
  The Cook County Law Library is the second largest County law library in the nation.
   
     
     
     



Protect endangered species from overuse of deadly ‘neonic’ pesticides
So-called neonics add a much smaller amount of pesticides to the environment than widespread spraying, but they are absorbed by plants, which makes the entire plant deadly to some species.

Sunday, June 26, 2022
Chicago Sun-Times
by EDITORIAL BOARD

Endangered species in America from bees to birds can start breathing just a little bit easier.

Earlier this month, the U.S EPA took an important step toward protecting numerous endangered species from hazardous insecticides.

First, the technical stuff. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on June 16 said three “neonic” pesticides are likely to adversely affect from two-thirds to more than three-fourths of America’s endangered species — 1,225 to 1,445 species in all. The three neonicotinoid insecticides, also known as neonics, are clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam.

Now it’s up to the federal government, along with the states, to build on that decision. If they do, it will help protect endangered species in the future and help make farming more sustainable in states such as Illinois with strong agricultural bases.

Editorials

“[The EPA ruling] is good news. It is a call for action by the federal government and state governments,” Steve Blackledge, senior director of Environment America’s Conservation America Campaign, told us. “Neonics are causing a whole lot of harm.”

Neonics are effective pesticides that are applied in small doses directly to the surface of seeds. They add a much smaller amount of pesticides to the environment than widespread spraying.

But they are absorbed by plants, which makes the entire plant — including the plant’s nectar, pollen and fruit — deadly to some species, and they can linger in soil for years. Carried in runoff, neonics pollute waterways throughout the nation.

“It’s kind of scary how completely [neonics] took over field crop agriculture,” Bill Freese, scientific director of the Washington-based Center for Food Safety, told us.

Because neonics are so effective, sustainable organic farming practices such as crop rotation and planting off-season cover crops have tended to fall by the wayside, Freese said.

Neonics are banned in the European Union, but they are the most popular insecticides in the United States. The Illinois Public Interest Research Group has called for ending excessive use of the pesticides, including a ban on consumer use. Studies have showed neonics harm bees, birds, butterflies, freshwater invertebrates and mammals, according to the Center for Biological Diversity.

As Lori Ann Burd, the center’s environmental health director, said in a statement,“We’re in the midst of a heartbreaking extinction crisis, and neonicotinoids are playing an outsized role in driving it.”

Many species are struggling. The once-common American bumblebee has declined by about 89% in the past 20 years. A 2019 analysis found wild bird populations in the continental U.S. and Canada had declined by 29% — or about 3 billion birds — since 1970.

Among the species the EPA found were likely to be adversely affected by neonics are the Chinook salmon, Florida panther, Indiana bat, whooping crane, California red-legged frog, Karner blue butterfly and yellow larkspur, the Center for Food Safety said.



Recent Headlines

After criticism over COVID, the CDC chief plans to make the agency more nimble
Wednesday, August 17, 2022
WBEZ News

CDC director calls for drastic changes to the agency following pandemic missteps
Wednesday, August 17, 2022
NBC 5 Chicago

Walensky, Citing Botched Pandemic Response, Calls for C.D.C. Reorganization
Wednesday, August 17, 2022
New York Times

Immigration advocates sue LexisNexis in Cook County Court over personal data
Tuesday, August 16, 2022
Chicago Journal

‘Dramatic rise’ in Kia and Hyundai thefts spurs warning from Cook County sheriff
Tuesday, August 16, 2022
Chicago Tribune

Man dies at Cook County Jail
Monday, August 15, 2022
Chicago Sun-Times

We Draw You In With Beauty
Sunday, August 14, 2022
Chicago Sun-Times

$5M Cook County grant program will help suburban manufacturers
Friday, August 12, 2022
The Daily

Cook County back down to medium COVID-19 risk level, but hospitalizations and deaths high across Illinois
Friday, August 12, 2022
Chicago Sun-Times

Annette Nance-Holt: The time is now: Why we need a statewide ban on assault weapons
Thursday, August 11, 2022
Chicago Tribune

Larry Suffredin on 20 years of problems solved and unsolved
Monday, August 08, 2022
The Daily Line

Foxx’s ‘rudderless’ office needs reorganization as county offices scramble to hire, retiring commissioner says
Monday, August 08, 2022
The Daily Line

Clerk of Cook County courts calls for more security after Daley Center breach
Monday, August 08, 2022
WBEZ News

A Chicago man was charged in an alleged security breach at a Daley Center courtroom
Friday, August 05, 2022
Special to suffredin.org

The Next Generation of Environmental Stewards Is Training at Cook County Forest Preserves
Thursday, August 04, 2022
Special to suffredin.org

Ex-Cook County assessor worker admits he helped lower taxes by $1M in exchange for home improvements
Thursday, August 04, 2022
Chicago Sun-Times

Cook County Jail detainee dies after medical emergency, officials say
Thursday, August 04, 2022
Chicago Sun-Times

Monkey Pox Update
Wednesday, August 03, 2022
Special to suffredin.org

A Cook County judge expressed fears before a ‘very serious breach’ at the Daley Center
Wednesday, August 03, 2022
WBEZ News

For the Love Of Water (FLOW) is a summary of news from the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago.
Tuesday, August 02, 2022
Special to suffredin.org

all news items

Paid for by Larry Suffredin and not at taxpayer expense. A Haymarket Production.
^ TOP