Suffredin- Changing County Government  
 

Accountability
Forest Preserves
Public Safety
Cook County Budget
Forest Pres. Budget
Property Tax Appeal
Health & Hospitals
Land Bank Authority
Policy Resolutions
Unsung Heroine

 

   
 
   
   
 
   
     
  Office phone numbers:  
   
 
 

The Cook County Code of Ordinances are the current laws of Cook County.

   
 

Search current and proposed Cook County Legislation in Larry's exclusive legislative library.

   
  The Cook County Law Library is the second largest County law library in the nation.
   
     
     
     



Cook County's short-lived 'soda' tax worked, says new study

Tuesday, February 25, 2020
University Of Illinois at Chicago
by Medical Express

Cook County's short-lived 'soda' tax worked, says new study
Lisa Powell, UIC distinguished professor and director of health policy and administration at the School of Public Health. Credit: University of Illinois at Chicago

A study of beverage sales in Cook County, Illinois, shows that for four months in 2017—when the county implemented a penny-per-ounce tax on both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened drinks—purchases of the taxed beverages decreased by 21%, even after an adjustment for cross-border shopping.

The findings of the study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, are published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

"This study comprehensively assessed the impact, both intended and unintended, of Cook County's 2017 sweetened beverage tax, and it showed that the tax was an effective method for reducing consumption of many beverages known to contribute to chronic health conditions, like Type II diabetes and obesity," said UIC's Lisa Powell, lead author of the study. "It also showed that the potential impact of the county's tax on public health was dampened by cross-border shopping, an important potential unintended consequence of any local-level tax policy."

Sometimes referred to as a "," the tax was positioned by county officials as a policy instrument to both raise revenue for the county and improve population health by reducing sweetened

beverage consumption.

To study beverage purchasing patterns, Powell and her colleagues tracked the quantity, by volume, of all beverages sold in and around Cook County using Universal Product Codes, or UPCs. The study included sales at supermarkets and grocery, convenience and other stores before and after the tax, which began on Aug. 2, 2017, and ended four months later on Nov. 30, when the tax was repealed. The post-tax data were compared with beverage purchases made during the same period in 2016. The researchers also compared the data with beverage purchases in Missouri's St. Louis County, which did not implement a similar tax.

In addition to a 21% net reduction in purchases of the taxed beverages—which was adjusted from 27% to account for the increase in cross-border shopping that was observed—the researchers found that, for untaxed beverages, there was no change in purchasing behavior in Cook County or in nearby communities.

"To see no change in purchases of untaxed beverages in the border area tells us that the observed increase in cross-border shopping was a tax avoidance strategy, not a shift that impacted general purchases," said Powell, UIC distinguished professor and director of health policy and administration.

"The data also showed that the tax was most effective when it came to larger-volume purchases, like cases or liters of soda, where the relative price increases faced by consumers were the greatest based on their low price per ounce," Powell said.

In the study, the researchers reference "price elasticity," which is an economics measurement of how responsive consumers are to changes in price alone.

The price elasticity of sweetened beverages in Cook County was -0.8, which Powell said is a bit lower than in other cities, like Seattle.

In another paper, which analyzed data from a sweetened beverage tax in Seattle—which notably only taxed sugar-sweetened beverages, not artificially sweetened beverages—Powell found that while sales of taxed beverages were reduced by a similar 22%, price elasticity was -1.1.

The data from Seattle, which were published last week in Economics & Human Biology, also diverged from the Cook County data in two areas: there was no notable cross-border shopping in Seattle, and there was an increase (4%) in the of untaxed beverages.

"These differences in cross-border shopping patterns demonstrate that local geographic context and the proximity with which the population lives to the border communities are important considerations and must be accounted for when assessing the overall impact of a given tax," Powell said. "Both studies contribute to the growing evidence that a sweetened beverage tax can lead to lower sales of sweetened beverages and hence may be an effective policy tool for reducing the harms associated with consumption of sugary beverages."

 

 



Recent Headlines

Daywatch: Virus crisis looms for Cook County’s incarcerated, the brave new world of pandemic shopping and what Mayor Lori Lightfoot thinks of your memes
Tuesday, March 31, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Another nurse claims retaliation after voicing concerns about PPE access (LIVE UPDATES)
Tuesday, March 31, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

$7.5M in payouts to go to former Cook County Jail detainees denied prescription drugs
Monday, March 30, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Postponement of most criminal, civil cases in Cook County Circuit Court extended through May
Monday, March 30, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Cook County medical examiner confirms 8 more coronavirus deaths, bringing total to 48
Monday, March 30, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Niles Township COVID-19 UPDATES
Monday, March 30, 2020
Special to suffredin.org

Rent coming due for many who’ve lost jobs or seen their hours cut
Sunday, March 29, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Community health centers face shutdowns as the coronavirus drives patients, funding away
Sunday, March 29, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Coronavirus prompts crackdown on crowds in Cook County forest preserves, and more closures possible if public doesn’t comply
Sunday, March 29, 2020
Chicago Tribune

Illinois confirms more than 1,000 new coronavirus cases as testing capacity grows
Sunday, March 29, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Cook County medical examiner confirms 8 more coronavirus deaths, bringing total to 40
Sunday, March 29, 2020
Chicago Sun-Times

Weekly updates from the Village of Glenview
Sunday, March 29, 2020
Special to suffredin.org

Design Evanston Project Review of the 1900 Sherman Avenue Project
Saturday, March 28, 2020
Evanston RoundTable

Inside the city's dry run for a pandemic
Friday, March 27, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

As coronavirus spreads at Cook County Jail, hundreds are released
Friday, March 27, 2020
Injustice Watch

Letter from the CEO of Cook County Health System
Friday, March 27, 2020
Special to suffredin.org

Cook County offering tax relief, too
Thursday, March 26, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago
Wednesday, March 25, 2020
Metropolitan Water Reclamation District

More COVID-19 Cases Discovered in Cook County Jail
Wednesday, March 25, 2020
WTTW News

Safety concerns spark clashes between hospital staffers and execs
Wednesday, March 25, 2020
Crain's Chicago Business

all news items

Paid for by Larry Suffredin and not at taxpayer expense. A Haymarket Production.
^ TOP